The Best Camping At Freycinet National Park

The Freycinet National Park, located on the east coast of Tasmania, is one of the most popular destinations for tourists and locals alike. The national park offers incredible vistas, beautiful walks ranging in difficulty and some of the best beaches in Australia. And to top it all off, camping at Freycinet National Park is made easy with plenty of options.

The ultimate way to experience Tasmania is by camping. Tasmania is all about the wilderness and wildlife, and what better way to immerse yourself in these natural wonders than camping right alongside them. The tiny island state is set up perfectly with world-class campsites, some that don’t even cost a cent!

The choices are plentiful when it comes to camping in Freycinet National Park, with beachside campsites close to the walking tracks or free options less than half an hour from the action. We know from experience it can be hard to decide where to camp when you’re visiting a destination for the first time, so we’ve compiled a list of all the options available for camping at Freycinet National Park to help you choose.

A few of the free options listed below are located inside the national park, so while it is free to camp at these destinations, a Tasmanian Parks pass is still required to access those campsites. 

Tracks Less Travelled watching an epic sunrise from Mt Freycinet in Freycinet National Park

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Free Camping At Freycinet National Park

What I love most about Tasmania is the abundance of free campsites. No other state we have ventured to have nearly the same amount, let alone the same quality. In Tasmania, you can find free campsites perched right alongside their world-class beaches. And camping at Freycinet National Park is no different… insane, I know!

But before I disclose these to you, please make sure to follow the Leave No Trace guidelines anytime you’re in nature – or anywhere for that matter. It will only take a few disrespectful people to ruin the incredible trust and generosity of the Tasmanian Parks and Councils.

Looking for more than just campsites?

Check out our full Freycinet National Park Itinerary. And if you are after a challenge, why not Climb Mt Amos or tackle the full Freycinet Peninsula Circuit Hike.

Or embark on some of the most well known tours in Coles Bay and Freycinet.

Friendly Beaches Camping Ground

Facilities

  • Toilets: Yes
  • Showers: No
  • Water: No
  • Bins: No
  • Fees: Tasmanian Parks pass
  • Campfires: No
  • Powered Sites: No
  • Suitable For: Tents, Campervans and Caravans
Beautiful Dramatic sunset over Friendly Beaches Camping Ground in Freycinet National Park

The Friendly Beaches camping ground that occupies Isaacs Point is arguably the best free camping in Tasmania and definitely our favourite campsite at Freycinet. These sites are sheltered from the elements with beautiful dense shrubs surrounding private sites, most big enough for a caravan.

One shared site is large enough for approximately 3 to 6 small camp set-ups, or three caravans. With views of Friendly Beach and Freycinet Peninsula’s famous Hazards range in the distance, this site is our favourite for a group. 

Two stunning boulder-strewn beaches stretch out either side of Isaacs Point, where the surf can be pumping and the snorkelling or rock pool wandering is always incredible. Keep an eye out for the local Wallabies who frequent the Friendly Beaches camping ground in search of friends. But please, do not feed them! Human food causes imbalance and some extreme health issues to our poor furry friends.

Friendly Beaches Campsite is located approximately 20 minutes north of Coles Bay and the Freycinet National Park hikes. While it’s a little further out from the action, this campsite is certainly worth the extra drive time. The road leading off the main road is dirt but well maintained for all vehicles.

A Wallaby eating wild flowers at Friendly Beaches Camping ground while camping at Freycinet National Park
The Milky Way glowing above Friendly Beaches camping ground in Freycinet National Park Tasmania
Little blue Superb Fairy-Rwen at Friendly Beaches camping ground in Freycinet National Park

River And Rocks Camping Ground

Facilities

  • Toilets: Yes
  • Showers: No
  • Water: No
  • Bins: No
  • Fees: Free
  • Campfires: Yes – in designated concrete fire pit
  • Powered sites: No
  • Suitable For: Tents, Campervans and Small Caravans
Van parked at River and Rocks campsite while camping in Freycinet National Park

The River and Rocks camping ground (also known as Swan River Camping) is located 10 minutes north of Coles Bay beside Swanwick Bay. This is another of our favourite campsites in the Freycinet National Park as it’s one of the lesser-known and used campsites in Freycinet. With tall gum trees guarding the perimeter, the beauty surrounding this campsite keeps both the serenity and some privacy.

Sectioned off sites have been created in this campground to accommodate different sized groups. The bay can be seen from the sandy grounds, as can the pink granite peaks of the Freycinet National Park in the distance. Down by the water, where you can also launch a boat, you might even be lucky enough to see thousands of little crabs scurrying about at low tide. 

The road into the River and Rocks Campsite is accessible by all cars along a well-maintained dirt road. This Freycinet National Park Camping Ground previously had a few sites deep with sand that we managed to bog ourselves in, but work has been done to fix this over winter. In busy periods, it may be a little difficult to manoeuvre a large caravan and I recommend checking it out first before driving down to the campsite.

Free Remote Camping In Freycinet National Park

To truly immerse yourself in the wonders of the Freycinet National Park, conquering the Freycinet Peninsula Circuit is a must. This circuit is a three-day hike trailing across the Isthmus to the range’s southern mountains. Three campsites are located along the hike that supports incredible vistas of the ocean and mountains. 

This option is not for everybody, as there is no road access. Hiking with a backpack full of your camping equipment is required for these campsites and the walk itself can be quite strenuous.

Wineglass Bay Camping Ground

Facilities

  • Toilets: Yes
  • Showers: No
  • Water: No
  • Bins: No
  • Fees: Tasmanian Parks pass
  • Campfires: No
  • Powered Sites: No
  • Suitable For: Tent only
Setting up camp at Wineglass Bay Beach Campsite in Freycinet National Parks

Camping by the shore of Wineglass Bay is one of our favourite experiences to date. This beautifully picturesque campsite is tucked just into the trees overlooking the turquoise water and fine white sands of the bay.

Swimming in the calm sea is the best way to cool off after a hike and snorkelling in the clear water would be incredible. The bay is full of wildlife, from seals and dolphins to sea eagles and wombats. Just don’t forget to leave the wildlife wild by observing at a distance and not feeding them. 

The walk from the Freycinet National Park car park to the Wineglass Bay campsite on the south end of the beach is 3 km and approximately 1 – 1.5 hours one way. This remote campsite involves the shortest walk of the three, which also means it can be the busiest over the summer period. 

Luckily, Wineglass Bay camping ground is sprawling and can accommodate quite a few tents. However, It is always best to stop in at the Information Centre before setting out to check the situation. 

Cute seal on the shore of Wineglass Bay Camping ground while camping at Freycinet National Park
Standing on the point of Wineglass Bay Beach while hiking the Freycinet Circuit
A Black Cockatoo perched in a Tree at Wineglass Bay Camping Ground in Freycinet National Park

Hazards Beach Campsite

Facilities

  • Toilets: Yes
  • Showers: No
  • Water: No
  • Bins: No
  • Fees: Tasmanian Parks pass
  • Campfires: No
  • Powered Sites: No
  • Suitable For: Tent only
Massive Star Fish washed up on Hazards Beach in Freycinet National Park
Sunset from Cooks Beach in Freycinet National Park
Looking at the beautiful Star Fish while camping at Freycinet National Park

Hazards Beach campsite is located on the wilder western side of the peninsula, at the southern end of the beach. This stretch of sand is less protected than Wineglass Bay and offers a different experience with loads of ocean debris to sift through on the coarse yellow sand.

Sunsets from this location are incredible as the sun dips behind the Hazards, throwing long shadows across the isthmus. Being a little harder to get to, this campsite is usually a little less occupied than Wineglass Bay camping ground. 

The campsite winds through the trees on the point looking back at Mt Mayson and Mt Amos in the distance. A 7 km, 2-hour walk one way from the Freycinet National Park car park along the Hazards Beach track is required to reach this campsite, the walk is relatively flat and navigationally easy.

Alternatively, a water taxi from Coles Bay can also be used in the summer months. The water taxi costs $55 per person one way or $75 return. 

Cooks Beach Campsite

Facilities

  • Toilets: Yes
  • Showers: No
  • Water: Yes, rainwater tank – untreated and not reliable
  • Bins: No
  • Fees: Tasmanian Parks pass
  • Campfires: No
  • Powered Sites: No
  • Suitable For: Tent only
The Hut at Cooks Beach Campsite in Freycinet National Park

Cooks Beach Campsite is the furthest south on the western side of the Freycinet Peninsula, located at the south end of Cooks Beach. This campsite in Freycinet National Park is home to the historic Cooks Hut, which supports stonework dating back to 1859. This hut can be used to shelter from the weather and for cooking, however, camping inside isn’t permitted. 

A rainwater tank has been set up alongside the hut, though the water inside is untreated so treat by boiling first or using other forms of treatment options if you’re not used to drinking untreated rainwater. 

The hike into Cooks Beach campsite is 12 km one way and takes approximately 3.5 hours. This campsite has even better views and sunsets than the Hazards Beach campsite in our opinion and is the best option if you’re planning to summit Mt Freycinet the following morning. 

Cooks Beach camping ground can also be accessed by boat in the summer months. A water taxi will take you from Coles Bay to Cooks Beach campsite for $60 per person one way or $90 return. 

Tracks Less Travelled Camp set up at Cooks Beach Campsite in Freycinet National Park

Popular Paid Camping At Freycinet National Park

Not all good things in life are free, and there are some campsites in Freycinet National Park that do require some payment to use. Though in all honesty, the price is still quite cheap in comparison to many other campsites around Australia.

Freycinet National Park Campground

The Freycinet National Park camping ground sprawls from Ranger Creek to Honeymoon Bay, offering world-class camping views, close access to the walking trails and plenty of swimming and snorkelling options. The camping ground is divided into three sections; Honeymoon Bay camping ground, Richardsons Beach camping ground (in the dunes) and Ranger Creek camping ground (powered sites).

As you would expect, camping at Freycinet National Park is well sought after, especially in the busy summer holidays. For this reason, and to be as fair as possible, there is a ballot system for reservations at Easter and between the 18th of December and the 10th of February. The ballot is drawn in August and reservations have a limit of 10 days for up to 6 people. Outside of the ballot season, the maximum stay is 14 days. To book outside of the ballot season, call or visit the Freycinet National Park’s visitors centre.

There is sometimes a misunderstanding that the ballot system is only for the Honeymoon

Bay camping ground. But the ballot covers more than just the Honeymoon Bay Camping Bookings, it covers all three campsites in the Freycinet National Park Camping Ground.

Honeymoon Bay Campground

Facilities

  • Toilets: Yes
  • Showers: No
  • Water: Yes, untreated
  • Bins: No
  • Fees: Tasmanian Parks pass, plus $13 per couple per night, $5 extra person per night, $2.50 per child over 5 per night
  • Campfires: No
  • Powered Sites: At Ranger Creek
  • Suitable For: Tent only – next to the car
Beautiful Honeymoon Bay overlooking the Hazards while Camping at Freycinet National Park

The Honeymoon Bay camping ground is the closest to the majority of Freycinet’s beautiful walking trails and is located on a vast granite knoll overlooking the famous bay. The sites are sheltered by tall sheoak trees and divided by wooden railings. Each provides a parking space and a wooden table to cook upon.

Short tracks from the Honeymoon Bay campsites lead to the famous Honeymoon Bay, which has phenomenal snorkelling for all levels and many rock pools to discover. Swimming in the calm and crystal clear water is the perfect way to end a day of exploring in our opinion.

In all honesty, this site is not our favourite. The views are incredible, but the Honeymoon Bay camping ground seems cramped compared to Richardsons Beach. However, if you were part of a group, this may be a great option to be close together.

The Honeymoon Bay camping ground is only open during the ballot season, falling on Easter and between the 18th of December and the 10th of February.

A campsite in the Honeymoon Bay Camping Ground while Camping in Freycinet

Richardsons Beach Campground

Facilities

  • Toilets: Yes
  • Showers: Cold Showers
  • Water: Yes
  • Bins: No
  • Fees: Tasmanian Parks pass, plus $13 per couple per night, $5 extra person per night, $2.50 per child over 5 per night
  • Campfires: No
  • Powered Sites: At Ranger Creek
  • Suitable For: Tent only – next to the car
Richardsons beach Camping Ground overlooking the famous Hazard Range of Freycinet National Park

The tent sites set among the dunes above Richardsons Beach camping ground are the best of the Freycinet National Park in our opinion. Each site comes with a car space and is sectioned off with vibrant shrubs surrounding the railings. Almost all provide stunning views out to Freycinet’s famous granite peaks.

Shared paths lead down to Richardsons Beach, a long stretch of sand and sea just waiting to be explored. The long expanse of the beach allows for plenty of room to enjoy a slice for yourself. A walking path located on the opposite side of Freycinet Drive links you to the iconic hiking trails located just 2.5km south of Richardsons Beach.

Some of the 26 sites in the dunes above Richardsons Beach camping ground are closed outside of the ballot season, which falls on Easter and between the 18th of December and the 10th of February.

Ranger Creek Campground

Facilities

  • Toilets: Yes
  • Showers: Coin-operated showers
  • Water: Yes
  • Bins: Yes
  • Fees: Tasmanian Parks pass, plus $16 per couple per night, $7 extra person per night, $3.50 per child over 5 per night
  • Campfires: No
  • Powered Sites: Yes
  • Suitable For: Caravans and Campervans
Parked up at a powered Honeymoon Bay Camping Ground while camping at Freycinet National Park

The Ranger Creek camping ground provides the most amenities, with coin-operated showers, grey water disposal and powered sites on lush green grass, shaded by giant gum trees. These sites are big enough for campervans and caravans (maximum 18ft) and offer beautiful views of the towering mountains to the south. 

Ranger Creek is another perfect location for snorkelling and inspecting rock pools on the point. There are 18 sites that are open year-round, located on the northern end of Richardsons Beach and closest to Coles Bay. The ballot system is used for these sites as well on Easter and between the 18th of December and the 10th of February.

Other Paid Camping In Freycinet National Park

Freycinet National Park camping grounds fill up extremely quickly, as you could imagine. But fear not, there are a couple of other options surrounding the national park, some offering quite a unique alternative. While the campsites below are still close to all of the attractions surrounding Coles Bay, they’re technically all out of the Freycinet National Park so no park fees apply to them.

Freycinet Golf Club Campground

Facilities

  • Toilets: Yes
  • Showers: No
  • Water: No
  • Bins: Rubbish removal
  • Fees: $10 per campsite
  • Campfires: No 
  • Powered Sites: No
  • Suitable For: Self-contained caravans and campervans
Hut a Freycinet Golf Club Campsite while camping at Freycinet National Park
Van parked up at the Freycinet Golf Club camping ground
Sifting through the book exchange at the golf club while camping at Freycinet National Park

The local Coles Bay golf club provides a beautiful grassy park for self-contained caravans and campervans to park up for the night for only $10. This is a great option for overflow in the busy summer months where the free campsites in Freycinet can get really packed. 

This campsite is located 6.5 km north of Coles Bay and provides toilets and BBQ facilities in the park close by. An honesty box is set up inside a shelter, where they even have a book exchange for those avid readers which I feel is a very nice touch.

Freycinet Paintball Campground

  • Toilets: Yes
  • Showers: Coin-operated shower ($2)
  • Water: No
  • Bins: Rubbish removal
  • Fees: $10 per person per night, kids 16 and under free
  • Campfires: Yes – in BYO fire drums or fire pot hire for $20
  • Powered Sites: No
  • Suitable For: Caravans, Campervans and Tents
Open fields at the Freycinet Paintball campground

This is seriously a cool option if you’re into paintballing, or even if you’re not. These rad guys offer a large grassy field to camp in, with the option of a game of paintball and a beer at their bar. They offer coin-operated showers and you can bring a fire drum for a campfire or rent one for $20. 

The Freycinet Paintball Campground is a little pricey compared to the rest of the camping in Freycinet National Park, but the novelty and the close proximity to a bar may be worth it. Their property is located 15 minutes north of Coles Bay overlooking Moulting Lagoon.

BIG4 Iluka on Freycinet Holiday Park

Of course, there is a caravan park in Coles Bay as well, I’m not sure if there are any Australian towns that don’t have one… correct me if I’m wrong! 

The BIG4 in Coles Bay offers all you would expect from a holiday park, from laundry services to powered sites and large amenity blocks. This caravan park is located within the town close to the Tavern and Muirs Beach making it a very central location to the action.

You can find a list of prices and different accommodation styles via the BIG4 website.

Pondering Frog Cafe

Facilities

  • Toilets: Yes
  • Showers: No
  • Water: Yes
  • Bins: Yes
  • Fees: Donation
  • Campfires: Yes
  • Powered Sites: No
  • Suitable For: Self-contained Caravans and Campervans
Pondering Frog Cafe, another alternative when camping in Freycinet National Park

Located just southwest of the turn off to Coles Bay, the Pondering Frog Cafe is a great alternative when things down at Freycinet are a little too crazy. This cafe offers camping in self-contained caravans and campervans by donation. 

The cafe is said to have the best peanut butter ice cream (which I am dying to try) and a large flat expanse to park upon. While it is the furthest option from the attractions in Freycinet, it is still only an easy 20-minute drive.

A visit to the Freycinet National Park is a must and with so many affordable or free camping options, it is super easy to loose yourself while exploring all of the magical things to do in Freycinet. There are, of course, many other accommodation options from Airbnb’s, lodges and beautiful hotels if camping is not your style. We always recommend Booking.com to find your perfect getaway.

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