Camping In The Catlins | Your Ultimate Guide To Choosing The Best Campsite

Tucked into the southeast corner of New Zealand’s South Island, The Catlins is an enchanting region bursting with waterfalls, rugged sea cliffs and verdant pockets of rainforest. But one of the most alluring things about this wild destination is just that – it’s wild and largely undeveloped, making camping in the Catlins the ultimate way to explore.

During our 4-month road trip through New Zealand, we spent several nights camping in the Catlins, flitting from one campground to the next. The freedom of camping allowed us to easily move around and explore the wonders hidden within the unruly forests and along the rugged coastlines. 

But while there are plenty of camping grounds in the Catlins to choose from, not all are worth your time or money. In this post, we will cover everything you need to know about camping in the Catlins, including the best places to stay and things to know before you go.

Camping in the Catlins at Purakaunui Campsite

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Essential Things To Know For Your Catlins Camping Trip

Where Is The Best Base To Explore The Catlins?

The Catlins region is located in the far southeast corner of New Zealand’s South Island, stretching between Balclutha and Invercargill. It encompasses Slope Point, the southernmost point of the country, and spreads inland to include protected pockets of ancient rainforests that are tucked between the rolling farmlands.

Dramatic sunset over the sea cliffs at Fortrose in the Catlins
Sea Cliffs at Fortrose

You’ll find a majority of the best things to do in the Catlins along the Southern Scenic Route, between Kaka Point and Fortrose. You can either choose to move camp each night as you journey through the Catlins, or you can base yourself in one location.

Luckily, the Catlins is compact and it takes no more than 1 hour 30 minutes to drive from one end to the other. There isn’t any huge benefit to basing yourself in one area compared to another, it all comes down to whether you’d rather be near a town, immersed in the forest or beside the beach. Below, we’ve provided some handy information about the main townships in the Catlins to help you choose the best camping location for you.

  • Owaka – Owaka is the largest town in the main Catlins region – but don’t be fooled, it’s still a tiny rural town. You’ll find all the basic services needed in Owaka, including a small grocery store, cafes, a pub, a pharmacy, a fuel station and a visitor centre. There is also a waste dump point for campervans and potable water.
  • Papatowai – The quaint township of Papatowai is located on the coast and between late October to Late April, you’ll find a 24/7 card-operated fuel service, a country store with basic goods such as milk and bread, a cute cafe named The Lost Gypsy that serves yummy baked goods and Peake’s Kitchen – a licenced food truck offering delicious seafood and burgers.
  • Curio Bay – If you’re keen to learn how to surf, then Curio Bay is the best place to base yourself. In the summer months, there is a surf school that offers lessons or board rentals. There is a cafe in the CurioScape Caravan Park that is also operational through the summer months – and may be open at limited times through winter – but it’d be best to contact them and check beforehand.
  • Kaka Point – Located in the northeast corner of the Catlins, Kaka Point is a beautiful little coastal village with good surf breaks and a range of accommodation options and an all-in-one cafe/bar/shop called The Point. This is open throughout the year – with slightly decreased opening times through winter.
Purakaunui Falls in the Catlins glowing in the afternoon sun
Purakaunui Falls

How To Pay For The DOC Campsites In The Catlins

There are three campsites in the Catlins that are managed by the Department of Conservation (DOC), which are Purakaunui Bay (our favourite), Papatowai and Tawanui. To stay at these campsites, you’re required to pre-book online before your arrival – even if you hold a DOC Campsite Pass.

For the best value for money, you can purchase a DOC Campsite Pass which allows you to pay a one-off fee for either 1 month or 1 year of unlimited use across most DOC Campsites in New Zealand.

Note: There is no phone service at Purakaunui Bay and Tawanui and only limited service for One NZ at Papatowai. You’ll need to organise your bookings in Owaka or another major town before departing for the Catlins.

Bring Warm Gear – Even In Summer!

Standing on the seacliffs at Slope Point with waves smashing agains the rocks
Slope Point

The Catlins are known for wild weather that can drastically change from a calm sunny day to a windy and wet one in a matter of moments. While the average summer temperatures are quite comfortable – ranging from 16 – 24℃ on average, the wind often comes in from the sub-Antarctic ocean and has a bitingly fresh chill to it.

In winter, the temperatures drop to around 8 – 13℃ with some frosts and the occasional light snowfall. But if the wind is blowing off the ocean, you can expect the temperature to ‘feel’ a great deal colder than 8℃!

If you’re planning to surf or swim in the ocean off the Catlins coast, we recommend packing your warmest wetsuit and chucking in your hood and booties just to be safe. The average water temperature in summer is 13℃ and in winter, a frigid 9℃!

Surfer at Purakaunui Bay in the Catlins
Surfing at Purakaunui Bay

Stock Up On Groceries In Dunedin Or Invercargill

While there is a small Four Square supermarket in Owaka, we highly recommend stocking up on groceries before leaving one of the major towns. Not only is the selection very limited in these small supermarkets, but groceries are also generally more expensive.

Other Things To Note For Camping In The Catlins

  • The Catlins is a very seasonal destination and many of the cafes close during winter. Between May and early October, it’s best to stock up on everything you need and avoid relying on services to be operating.
  • There is limited phone service throughout the Catlins. We suggest organising your trip before making the drive to the Catlins and booking any necessary camping grounds ahead of time.
  • You will find the cheapest fuel in Owaka, but even then it is generally around 5 cents cheaper than Invercargill or Dunedin.
  • There is a dump station next to the Catlins Inn in Owaka which provides potable water and a large garbage bin to dispose of your general waste.
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6 Best Campsites In The Catlins, New Zealand

Now that we’ve covered the logistics for camping in the Catlins, we’re ready to divulge our favourite campsites throughout the region. In this section, you’ll find a list of our 6 top-rated camping grounds that we honestly and gladly recommend.

Purakaunui Bay Campsite

Location: Purakaunui Bay
Fees/Bookings: $10 NZD per person per night (can use DOC Campsite Pass)
Toilets: Yes, non-flush
Bins: No
Power: No
Water: Yes, untreated
Phone Service: No
Campfires: Yes – in designated fireplaces if there is no fire ban
Dogs Allowed: On-leash only
Most suitable For: Campervans, camping trailers, caravans and tents

Campervans camping in Purakaunui Bay camping ground in the Catlins

Set in a grassy field overlooking the monstrous white sea cliffs of Purakaunui Bay, you’ll find a DOC campsite with 5-star views. The sprawling campground can fit up to 40 camping set-ups along the grassy stretch of land and with no designated sites, you’re free to park wherever you please.

Purakaunui Bay is a favourite among surfers and you’ll often find seals lazing about on the vast sandy beach. The river mouth provides the perfect swimming spot and foreground for an incredibly picturesque campsite – plus, the sunrises and sunsets are impossibly beautiful.

Sunset over Purakaunui Bay while camping in the Catlins
Surfers standing on Purakaunui Beach waiting for the famous waves

The only downside to the Purakaunui Bay Campsite is its popularity and slightly limited flat spots. But if you don’t mind sharing this magical destination with close neighbours and potentially having an uneven sleep, then we highly recommend camping at Purakaunui Bay!

Pros:

  • The best views out of all the camping grounds in the Catlins
  • Great surf
  • Popular hang-out for seals

Cons:

  • Popular for large groups and can often be noisy at night
  • The grassy field can get boggy after rain and there are very limited gravel options available

CurioScape Campground

Location: Curio Bay
Fees/Bookings: From $35 – $55 NZD per site depending on time of year and type of site
Toilets: Yes
Bins: Yes
Power: Yes
Water: Yes
Phone Service: Yes
Campfires: No
Dogs Allowed: No
Most suitable For: Campervans, camping trailers, caravans and tents

Campservan parked at Curio Bay Campsite in the Catlins

CurioScape Campground sits on the rugged headland between Curio Bay and Porpoise Bay, with black crumbling cliffs plummeting to the wild ocean below one side and a sweeping sandy beach on the other.

The bays are famous for their beginner-advanced surf breaks and the abundance of wildlife that frequent the sea and the sandy shore, including yellow-eyed penguins and Hectors dolphins.

Wild Surf at Curio Bay with a rainbow rising from the ocean

This private campground is a fantastic option if you’re searching for a little more than a basic DOC campsite. These additional facilities include a coin-operated laundry, a kitchen and an onsite cafe – open during the summer season. Not to mention, the views from your private sheltered campsite are comparable to those at Purakaunui Bay – almost!

Pros:

  • Additional facilities
  • The best chance to see yellow-eyed penguins after dark – without having to drive anywhere
  • Great surf location and the option for a lesson and/or board and wetsuit rentals

Cons:

  • More expensive compared to the DOC campsites
  • The store, cafe and surf school are closed during winter

Papatowai Campground

Location: Papatowai
Fees/Bookings: $10 NZD per person per night (can use DOC Campsite Pass)
Toilets: Yes
Bins: No
Power: No
Water: Yes, untreated
Phone Service: One NZ only
Campfires: No
Dogs Allowed: On-leash only
Most suitable For: Campervans, camping trailers, caravans and tents

Papatowai Campground in the Catlins
Papatowai Campground Camp Kitchen

If you’re after a more manicured campsite – without the additional cost – then Papatowai Campground is your answer! You’ll find plenty of relatively flat grassy sites off the gravel road that winds through the shady campground.

But for a more peaceful stay, you’ll sacrifice beach views. To reach the sea, you’ll walk through the thin band of forest separating the estuary from the campsite and walk a few hundred metres south to Picnic Point. From the beach, you’re gifted stunning views of monstrous white sea cliffs and Long Point in the north.

Pros:

  • Generally quieter than Purakaunui Bay
  • Additional facilities such as an indoor shelter with sinks
  • Located right behind the country store and food truck, with amazing coffee a short walk up the road

Cons:

  • No beach views
  • To access the beach, you need to walk for roughly 10 minutes along the estuary

The Whistling Frog Camping

Location: Chaslands
Fees/Bookings: From $55 – $70 NZD per site depending on the type of site
Toilets: Yes
Bins: Yes
Power: Yes
Water: Yes
Phone Service: Yes (free wifi)
Campfires: No
Dogs Allowed: Yes
Most suitable For: Campervans, camping trailers, caravans and tents

Campervans parked in the powered sites in the Whistling Frog Campground in the Catlins

Located centrally between the multitude of attractions in the Catlins, the Whistling Frog Resort is a holiday park style camping ground in the Catlins that provides the perfect base for those wishing for a little more luxury and a dining option.

At the Whistling Frog Resort, you’ll find lovely grassy sites to set up, hot showers at no extra cost and a camp kitchen. You’ll also have the convenience of a cafe/bar/restaurant on the premises that offers happy hour during the summer months. However, you will certainly pay for these extra luxuries with prices starting at $55 NZD per site, per night!

The Whistling Frog Restaurant

Pros:

  • Unlimited hot showers at no additional cost
  • On-site cafe, bar & restaurant
  • Close to McLean Falls and Cathedral Caves

Cons:

  • Expensive

Kaka Point Camping Ground

Location: Kaka Point
Fees/Bookings: $20 NZD per person, per night (non-powered), $25 NZD per person, per night (powered)
Toilets: Yes
Bins: Unknown
Power: Yes
Water: Yes
Phone Service: Yes
Campfires: No
Dogs Allowed: On-leash only
Most suitable For: Campervans, camping trailers, caravans and tents

Kaka Point in the Catlins

Located at the northeastern edge of the Catlins, Kaka Point Camping Ground is a beautiful forested place to stay either at the beginning or end of your road trip through the Catlins. This boutique holiday park offers free unlimited showers, a communal block with a fully-equipped kitchen and powered site options.

We loved this cute little coastal town, which boasts great surf when the conditions are working and a tasty restaurant down by the water. But the best part about staying at this camping ground in the Catlins is the fact you’re only a 15-minute drive from Nugget Point Lighthouse, which is the best place to view the sunrise.

Pros:

  • Unlimited hot showers at no additional cost
  • The Point Cafe and Restaurant is within walking distance
  • Walking distance to the surf beach
  • Close to Nugget Point Lighthouse

Cons:

  • On the expensive side
  • Further away from the waterfalls in the Catlins

Catlins Newhaven Holiday Park

Location: Surat Bay
Fees/Bookings: $40 NZD per couple, per night (unpowered), $50 NZD per couple, per night (powered)
Toilets: Yes
Bins: Yes
Power: Yes
Water: Yes
Phone Service: Free wifi
Campfires: No
Dogs Allowed: No
Most suitable For: Campervans, camping trailers, caravans and tents

A favourite for families, the Catlins Newhaven Holiday Park offers beach-front campsites in the beautiful Surat Bay with plenty of toys and activities for the kids. The bay is a popular hang-out spot for sea lions and a lovely coastal walk starts at the campsite and takes you to the nearby Cannibal Bay.

While the price is on the higher side, Newhaven Holiday Park provides all the expected amenities and is conveniently located to explore the Catlins. Plus, you’re just a short 10-minute drive from the shops in Owaka.

Pros:

  • Beautiful location
  • Great for families with young kids
  • A very high chance of seeing sea lions on the beach
  • Beach-front campsites

Cons:

  • Expensive
  • You have to pay $2 for a 7-minute shower

4 Freedom Camping Grounds In The Catlins

For those who are travelling in a self-contained certified campervan, you also have the option to stay at several freedom camping spots in the Catlins. Of course, these are more basic than even the most basic DOC campsites, consisting mostly of a gravel car park and a toilet. But as long as you’re not expecting anything grand, they’re perfect for an overnight stop – and they’re completely free!

Owaka Freedom Camping Site

Location: Owaka
Fees/Bookings: Free
Toilets: Yes
Bins: Yes
Power: No
Water: Yes
Phone Service: Yes
Campfires: No
Dogs Allowed: No
Most suitable For: Self-contained certified campervans only

The Catlin Inn freedom campsite in Owaka

The Catlins Inn offers free overnight camping for self-contained campervans in their car park behind the pub. The Inn also provides campers with hot showers for $5 and you’ll find a dump station and potable water next to the car park.

This is a great spot to stay if you get to the Catlins late or you’d like to be closer to additional services such as a small grocery store and the DOC visitor centre.

Pros:

  • Free for self-contained certified campervans
  • Grocery store and cafes within walking distance
  • Shower option (for $5)

Cons:

  • Not a very pretty area
  • Could be quite noisy next to the pub
  • Owaka isn’t on the coast, requiring you to drive to the beach

Waikawa Freedom Campground

Location: Waikawa
Fees/Bookings: Free for self-contained certified campervans
Toilets: Yes
Bins: No
Power: No
Water: Yes, untreated
Phone Service: Yes
Campfires: No
Dogs Allowed: No
Most suitable For: self-contained certified campervans only

Vans parked at Waikawa freedom campsite in the Catlins, New Zealand
Waikawa Campground public toilet

Just 5 minutes from the popular Curio Bay, you’ll find a spacious car park in Waikawa that allows overnight camping for self-contained certified campervans. The car park overlooks the pretty Waikawa Harbour and offers a quiet and peaceful place to rest while exploring Curio Bay.

There is a toilet block in the car park and rubbish bins – including recycling. We liked this freedom campsite the most due to its location and the nice setting. The Slope Point Freedom Campground is closer to the beach and further away from the main road, but there aren’t many attractions nearby.

Pros:

  • Close to Curio Bay
  • Large and spacious with plenty of flat spaces
  • Free for self-contained certified campervans

Cons:

  • Next to the road

Slope Point Freedom Campground

Location: Slope Point
Fees/Bookings: Free for self-contained certified campervans
Toilets: Yes, non-flush
Bins: No
Power: No
Water: Yes, untreated
Phone Service: Yes
Campfires: No
Dogs Allowed: Unknown
Most suitable For: Self-contained certified campervans only

Van parked at Slope Point Campground in the Catlins

Accessed via Weir Rd, following the signs to Weir Beach, you’ll find a grassy clearing beside Haldane Bay. Slope Point offers a picturesque campsite for self-contained campervans with a long drop toilet, a water tank (boil before drinking) and an outdoor kitchen sink that you can use to wash up.

If you’d like to stay close to the beach and away from the noise of the main road, the Slope Point Freedom Campground is a great choice. However, there isn’t very much nearby other than Slope Point – the southernmost tip of New Zealand.

Inlet at Slope Point Freedom Campsite

Pros:

  • Walking distance to the beach
  • Away from the main road and offers more of a natural setting
  • Free for self-contained certified campervans

Cons:

  • Not very many attractions nearby
  • Basic long drop toilet

Fortrose Freedom Campground

Location: Fortrose
Fees/Bookings: Free for self-contained certified campervans
Toilets: Yes, 200 m away
Bins: Yes, 200 m away
Power: No
Water: Yes, untreated
Phone Service: Yes
Campfires: No
Dogs Allowed: No
Most suitable For: Self-contained certified campervans only

Fortrose Freedom Campground in The Catlins, New Zealand

Bordering the driftwood-filled shore of the Toetoes Harbour, you’ll find a freedom campsite just north of the boat ramp car park. Self-contained certified campervans are allowed to camp overnight in a clearing beside the beach in Fortrose.

While it sounds idyllic, the clearing isn’t very appealing and other than a shipwreck that you can attempt to find at low tide, there isn’t much to do in Fortrose. We didn’t get very good vibes from this freedom campsite and chose to move on.

Pros:

  • Next to the beach
  • Fortrose Cafe and Restaurant is within walking distance
  • Free for self-contained certified campervans

Cons:

  • 200 m walk to the toilets
  • We didn’t get a very good vibe from this location
  • Next to the main road
  • Further away from the main attractions in the Catlins

4 Other Campsites In The Catlins

Although these 4 campsites didn’t make it into our top 6 camping grounds in the Catlins, they are still worth considering if you’re having trouble finding available spots or if you’d like more choices.

Hillview Camping Stay

Location: Ahuri Flat
Fees/Bookings: $15 NZD per person, per night
Toilets: Yes
Bins: Yes
Power: Yes
Water: Yes
Phone Service: Free wifi
Campfires: Yes
Dogs Allowed: Yes
Most suitable For: Campervans, camping trailers, caravans and tents

Hillview Camping Stay is nestled in the picturesque rolling hills behind Kaka Point and Nugget Point, providing a unique ‘farm stay’ experience while still being close to the coast. This camping ground in the Catlins offers affordable rates and additional amenities such as showers (6 minutes for $2), laundry services ($5 per load), free wifi, and barbeque facilities.

Although we didn’t visit Hillview ourselves, the reviews are generally positive, and its location is ideal for exploring the northeastern attractions while saving some money compared to Kaka Point Camping Ground.

Pros:

  • A cheaper option near Kaka Point and Nugget Point
  • Hot showers for $2 for 6 minutes and laundry facilities ($5 per load)
  • Beautiful view of the rolling hills

Cons:

  • A little further away from the main attractions in the Catlins

Tawanui Campground

Location: Tawanui
Fees/Bookings: $10 NZD per person per night (can use DOC Campsite Pass)
Toilets: Yes
Bins: No
Power: No
Water: Yes, untreated
Phone Service: No
Campfires: Yes – in designated fireplaces if there is no fire ban
Dogs Allowed: On-leash only
Most suitable For: Campervans, camping trailers, caravans and tents

Campervan parked at toilet block in Tawanui Campground

Tawanui Campground is situated in a spacious grassy area, surrounded by native forests alongside the Catlins River. With ample room for up to 40 camping setups, it is conveniently located near the river, where you can access The Catlins River Walk – a 12 km track that connects with the Whisps Track.

While the forest is pleasant, the camping grounds can become muddy after rainfall and the toilet block is often occupied by birds’ nests and lacks cleanliness. Needless to say, this is our least favourite DOC campsite in the Catlins. Plus, getting there requires a detour on a gravel road away from the attractions.

Open grassy field of Tawanui Campground

Pros:

  • Next to The Catlins River Walk
  • Quiet forest setting

Cons:

  • Dirty toilet block
  • Not very close to any waterfalls

Pounawea Motor Camp

Location: Pounawea
Fees/Bookings: Unknown
Toilets: Yes
Bins: Yes
Power: Yes
Water: Yes
Phone Service: Yes
Campfires: No
Dogs Allowed: Yes
Most suitable For: Campervans, camping trailers, caravans and tents

Pounawea Campsite near Owaka in the Catlins

Located just a 5-minute drive south of Owaka, the Pounawea Motor Camp sits alongside the Catlins River near its mouth. This campsite in the Catlins offers all the typical amenities, including laundry facilities, showers, and a kitchen.

If you prefer camping near the cafes and shops in Owaka – without sacrificing water-front views – the Pounawea Motor Camp is a great choice. However, in our opinion, the Kaka Point Camping Ground, Catlins Newhaven Holiday Park, and Papatowai Campground offer more appealing locations.

Pros:

  • Close to Owaka
  • Quite central to the waterfalls and other things to do in the Catlins
  • Estuary walks begin nearby

Cons:

  • The area isn’t as pretty as nearby Newhaven Holiday Park
  • No prices found online

Thomas’ Catlins Lodge & Campground

Location: Owaka
Fees/Bookings: $32 per couple, per night (unpowered), $38 per couple, per night (powered)
Toilets: Yes
Bins: Yes
Power: Yes
Water: Yes
Phone Service: Yes
Campfires: No
Dogs Allowed: Yes
Most suitable For: Campervans, camping trailers, caravans and tents

Thomas’s Catlins Lodge & Campground is the most unique camping ground in the Catlins, to say the least. This campground is located on the grounds of a 100-year-old hospital that has been transformed into a backpackers/lodge-style accommodation.

If the idea of ghosts haunting the halls doesn’t bother you, then this camping ground in the Catlins offers great value. All campers receive complimentary access to the kitchen, dining room, games room, and showers with no additional charges.

Pros:

  • Great value for money
  • Within walking distance of cafes and shops in Owaka
  • Additional facilities include showers, a full kitchen, free wifi and a barbeque area

Cons:

  • Many reviews state it is quite creepy
  • Not within walking distance to the beach
  • This isn’t your typical campsite that allows you to be close to nature

FAQs About Camping In The Catlins

Is The Catlins Worth Visiting?

The Catlins is a peaceful destination boasting waterfalls, dramatic coastal cliffs and pockets of ancient rainforests. Rolling farmlands fill the spaces between, giving this place a less rugged than what we had anticipated based on our research of the Catlins.

Personally, we were slightly disappointed with the Catlins, expecting more forests with exciting walking trails and fewer farmlands. However, it is still a worthwhile addition to your itinerary if you have extra time to spare and seek tranquillity and fewer crowds in your South Island adventure. But I certainly wouldn’t choose the Catlins over Fiordland, Aoraki/Mt Cook National Park or the Queenstown and Wanaka region.

How Many Days Do I Need For The Catlins?

To fit in every waterfall and coastal walk that the Catlins have to offer, we recommend allowing at least 3 – 4 days. This allows you to visit each attraction without rushing, leaving time to enjoy a relaxed afternoon lazing by the beach.

With that said, if you only have 1 – 2 days to spare, you can easily fit in the top things to do in the Catlins. We recommend prioritising Nugget Point Lighthouse, McLean Falls and the Waipohatu Waterfalls Track

Standing in front of Pouriwai Falls on the Waipohatu Falls Track in the Catlins
Pouriwai Falls on the Waipohatu Falls Track

Can You Freedom Camp In The Catlins?

While there are restrictions on freedom camping in the Catlins – you’re not allowed to camp at any car park on the beach unfortunately – there are four dedicated freedom camping spots that are scattered throughout the region, which are explained in detail above.

What Is The Closest City To The Catlins?

The closest city to the Catlins is Dunedin, located 1 hour 30 minutes north. You’ll find several tour operators offering day trips to the Catlins from Dunedin, or you can simply rent a car and enjoy a personally curated adventure of the many Catlins’ attractions.

What Are Catlins Known For?

The Catlins is famously known for its abundance of waterfalls hidden by dense temperate rainforests and the rugged coastline that includes the southernmost point of New Zealand. The region is also home to the rare yellow-eyed penguin, seals, sea lions and various seabirds.

What Are The Best Things To Do In The Catlins?

Nugget Point Lighthouse
Nugget Point LIghthouse

There are countless walks in the Catlins that lead you to waterfalls, towering sea cliffs, caves and through vibrant rainforests. They range from easy to moderate, offering something for every traveller. Below is a list of our top 4 things to do in the Catlins.

Final Thoughts On Camping In The Catlins

Camping in the Catlins is easily the best way to explore the southeast coastal region, with plenty of options and stunning views to enjoy at an affordable price. When we visited the Catlins, we stayed at Purakanui Bay, Papatowai and Waikawa Campgrounds and can highly recommend each of these destinations. Furthermore, unless you have a set-up you can leave behind, we suggest choosing 2 – 3 camping grounds in the Catlins to avoid backtracking.

Have you visited the Catlins? Which campsite is your favourite? We’d love to hear about your experience in the comments below. As always, if you have any further questions about the Catlins, please feel free to reach out.

Happy Adventuring 🙂