16 Best Hiking Stoves In Australia For 2024

Having the best hiking stove is like gold in the wilderness. Imagine yourself sitting back, munching on a delectable dinner as the sun slips below the mountain peaks. Or waking with a steaming cup of coffee to get you fuelled for another adventure-packed day.

The only thing that could ruin such a dream is an unreliable stove – or none at all!

So the question is, which hiking stove out of the endless number of options is right for you and your hiking style?

We’ve had our fair share of misfortunes when it comes to cooking in the wild and through testing multiple backpacking stoves and encountering much trial and error, our hiking stove set-up is almost fool-proof for our adventures.

In this post, we unravel the deep confusion around hiking stoves to help you decide which one is right for you – including what fuel, size and style to choose. Plus, you’ll find a list of the best hiking stoves for 2024 for you to compare.

Sitting on my hiking sleeping mat while cooking breakfast on my Jetboil Sumo backpacking stove

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How To Choose The Best Hiking Stove For Your Adventures

Define Your Hiking Style

With an abundance of options out there, ranging enormously in price, it can be very difficult to know which hiking stoves will be sufficient enough for your adventures – especially if you’re just starting out.

The first thing to do is define your hiking style. This will help narrow down the decision as to what is right for you, much the same as if you were in the market for a new down jacket or hiking shirt.

These are the questions to ask yourself in order to gain an understanding of what style of backpacking stove is best for you.

  • Where do you usually hike? 
  • What season do you predominantly hike in? 
  • Roughly how long are your trips?

Once you’ve answered these questions, you’ll be able to eliminate the factors that are of least importance to you and ultimately save money. For example, if you don’t hike through the depths of winter, there is no need to choose the best backcountry stove for freezing conditions. But, if you hike in places that are commonly struck with strong winds, you may want to choose the most protected option, like Jetboil’s integrated stove range.

Cooking camp dinner with a Jetboil Sumo while staying comfortable on our hiking sleeping mats

Types Of Hiking Stoves

It’s easy to get overwhelmed by the different types of hiking stoves but when you break it down, you’ll most often find that only one or two types are suited to you.

There are three main categories for hiking stoves, plus a few extras that we’ll touch on but don’t recommend for the average hiker as they require a lot more time and patience.

Gas Canister Stoves

Jetboil Mightymo gas cooking stove, one of the best lightweight and portable stove for hiking

Canister stoves are the most popular and user-friendly option on the market. Their simple and small design is perfect for summer adventures and they’re cheap! Canister stoves work by screwing onto the top of a fuel canister which contains a mixture of two pre-pressurised gases – isobutane and propane.

The cheapest designs require a match to light the stove and more expensive options contain a push-button igniter – though you’d still want to carry a packet of matches just in case the igniter fails!

Pros

  • Extremely small and lightweight
  • The gas burns clean (no black marks everywhere)
  • Most affordable option
  • Very quick to light – you don’t need to prime them
  • They’re easy to adjust for simmer control
  • Gas canisters self-seal which prevents possible leaks

Cons

  • The flame isn’t covered, resulting in less efficiency in high winds
  • Their efficiency also plummets in cold conditions (unless the stove has a pressure regulator)
  • The design is a little flimsy, requiring extra care not to tip it when using a larger pot
  • Difficult to know how much fuel is left in the canister, requiring you to bring a back-up
  • The empty canisters need to be disposed of properly and have no way of being reused

Best For

  • First-time hikers
  • Mild climates
  • Budget hikers

Integrated Gas Canister Stoves

Jetboil Sumo, one of the best hiking stoves for groups cooking on hikes

Integrated canister stoves work with the same isobutane/propane gas, but their design includes an insulated pot that twists onto the stove to create a wind barrier for increased performance. The brand at the forefront of this design is Jetboil.

This type of stove is predominantly designed to boil water fast – which they can do in 2.5 minutes – but some systems are also designed with exceptional simmer control.

Pros

  • Better efficiency in high wind compared to the basic canister stove
  • The gas burns clean (no black marks everywhere)
  • Comes with an insulated pot
  • Very quick to light – you don’t need to prime them
  • Gas canisters self-seal which prevents possible leaks
  • Boils water the fastest out of all the competition – which results in less gas used

Cons

  • The design is often tall which can be a bit tippy
  • A little more expensive compared to the basic canister stove
  • Their efficiency still decreases in cold conditions (unless the stove has a pressure regulator, then it’s suited to temperatures down to -6℃)
  • Difficult to know how much fuel is left in the canister, requiring you to bring a back-up
  • The empty canisters need to be disposed of properly and have no way of being reused

Best For

  • Most hikers
  • Mild/cool climates (cold climates if the stove has a fuel regulator)
  • Windy climates

Remote Gas Canister Stoves

MSR Windpro 2 Backpacking stove, a great fuel stove for cooking in extreme weather conditions

The remote canister stoves work very similarly to the basic canister stove, except they have a fuel hose connecting the gas canister to the stove. In some designs, the canister can be used upside down for increased performance while hiking in cold weather.

The only other benefit of this type of canister stove (especially if it doesn’t have the ability to invert the fuel canister) is the fact that they are a touch sturdier than the basic sit-on-top models.

Pros

  • Better efficiency in cold weather – if the gas canister can be inverted
  • The gas burns clean (no black marks everywhere)
  • Very quick to light – you don’t need to prime them
  • Gas canisters self-seal which prevents possible leaks
  • More sturdy than the basic canister stoves

Cons

  • A little more expensive compared to the basic canister stove
  • Their efficiency is lowered in windy conditions
  • Difficult to know how much fuel is left in the canister, requiring you to bring a back-up
  • The empty canisters need to be disposed of properly and have no way of being reused

Best For

  • Cool/cold climates

Liquid (and multi-fuel) Fuel Stoves

MSR Whisperlite International, a great backpacking stove for International travel and cooking in cold weather

Liquid fuel stoves work in the same way as remote canister stoves, with a fuel hose connecting the fuel bottle to the stove. The liquid fuel used is predominantly white gas, which is highly refined and burns clean and hot – making it an ideal choice for cold climates and high altitudes.

Plus, liquid fuel is more readily available worldwide and some models also run off multiple fuel types such as kerosene and unleaded gas – which is even more accessible when you find yourself in remote destinations.

But, there is one major negative associated with a liquid fuel stove and that is the need for priming. This can be dangerous if not done correctly and takes time. Watch this video from Backpacker Magazine to learn more about priming a liquid fuel stove.

Pros

  • Very efficient in cold weather and high-altitude areas
  • Some models have a multi-fuel option, allowing you to change between gas or liquid
  • Most models also work on readily available kerosene or unleaded gas – making it easier to find refills worldwide
  • Very fuel efficient
  • The gas burns clean (no black marks everywhere)
  • Less waste, which makes this option more sustainable

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Time-consuming and finicky
  • Need to prime, which can be dangerous if done incorrectly
  • More maintenance required
  • Fuel spills are possible

Best For

  • International travelling
  • Cold climates and high altitudes
  • Constant use (more cost-effective in the long run)

Alcohol Stoves

A Trangia Hiking Fuel Stove

Alcohol stoves use methylated spirits (aka denatured alcohol in the US) which sits in a little metal container beneath a pot. The most popular brand in Australia is Trangia, which is often used for school camps due to its low price and basic setup. You may remember the hours spent at camp, trying to scrub the soot off the bottom of the pots – or perhaps you’ve buried the memory!

These stoves are a favourite for long-distance hikers as they’re lightweight, durable and fuel is cheap. But personally, I don’t recommend them due to the immense mess left by the black soot.

Pros

  • Methylated spirits is very readily available
  • Very simple to use
  • Budget-friendly
  • Most have the option to include a pot set and windscreen
  • Less waste, which makes this option more sustainable

Cons

  • Alcohol doesn’t burn as hot, resulting in long boil times
  • Can be dangerous if tipped over as the fire will spread
  • Makes a mess with the soot, which can be avoided by diluting the alcohol with water – but this lowers its efficiency
  • Difficult to regulate the flame
  • Fuel spills are possible

Best For

  • Budget hikers
  • Long-distance hikers

Wood-burning Hiking Stoves

Toaks STV 12 Backpacking stove for camping in the backcountry

For those that love a languid evening, foraging for firewood to cook your meal could be very appealing. The wood-burning stoves are just as you’d imagine, they use twigs, dried ferns and small sticks for fuel which is fed into a metal chamber.

Wood-burning stoves are a lightweight option as you don’t need to carry fuel, however, they aren’t as efficient in power or boil time and leave a black sooty mess on the bottom of your pot. We’d only recommend this stove for hikers who enjoy the novelty of using a fire and have all the time in the world once they arrive in camp.

It’s also important to note that you’ll find fire bans in many places you plan to hike and camp, leaving this option unusable in many circumstances.

Pros

  • A lightweight option
  • No need to carry fuel
  • Only uses organic fuel, which makes this option the most sustainable

Cons

  • A very slow cook time
  • Can be dangerous if the fire spreads
  • Makes a mess with the soot
  • Cannot simmer
  • Restrictions prohibit the use of wood-fire stoves in many places throughout Australia and other countries
  • Finding firewood can be difficult

Best For

  • Long-distance hikers with plenty of time
  • The novelty of using a wood-fire to cook your meal

Solid-Fuel Tablet Stoves

Esbit Pocket Hiking stove

A solid-fuel tablet stove (or hexamine stove) works by placing a hexamine fuel tablet into a metal chamber and lighting it with a match. It works in a similar way to fire starter tablets, by slowly burning without smoke.

This is an ultra-lightweight and inexpensive option, however, the boil time is approximately 20 minutes and they are prohibited in some fire-restricted areas. Plus, they can leave a sticky mess on the bottom of your pot.

Pros

  • Ultralight option
  • Packs down small
  • No chance of fuel leaking
  • Initially inexpensive

Cons

  • A very slow cook time
  • Can be dangerous if the fire catches surrounding debris
  • Can leave a sticky substance on the bottom of the pot
  • Cannot simmer
  • Restrictions prohibit the use of solid-fuel tablet stoves in some places throughout Australia and other countries
  • Not a sustainable option
  • Fuel is expensive in comparison to other options

Best For

  • Ultralight hikers
  • Casual overnight budget hikers

Durability Of Hiking Stoves

Cooking breakfast behind a rock used for wind break on Mt Eliza

Generally, stoves for hiking are built to withstand a fair beating from the elements and the user. However, you can expect to have more issues with a backpacking stove supporting multiple components than a simple construction like the alcohol or tablet stoves – which are the most durable options.

For example, integrated fuel stoves are an incredibly innovative design that can withstand strong winds. But compared to a simple canister stove which has three prongs and a flame control twist valve, there are more components that can break on an integrated hiking stove.

In regards to liquid fuel stoves, they are notorious for having issues if you don’t maintain them properly – which involves cleaning the line regularly to avoid clogging. But if you treat them well, they’ll last just as long as a canister stove.

Size and Packability Of Hiking Stoves

Packing down my backpacking stove in cold weather conditions while hiking Mt Eliza in Tasmania

The size of a hiking stove is generally quite small, it’s the pot set and the fuel that takes up the most room in your backpack. That said, the smallest option you’ll find – disregarding the additional pieces – is a canister stove.

In regards to packability, some options such as the Jetboil include a pot set and design it so all the components can fit inside. This helps with packing it into your hiking backpack as there are no awkward shapes.

The most cumbersome stove for backpacking is the liquid fuel stove, this is due to the extra parts needed. But if you’re hiking through the snow or at high altitudes, the extra weight will be worth the increased efficiency found in these stoves.

Weight Of Backpacking Stoves

Sunrise coffee from my hiking stove while camping in Mt Field National Park

It’s difficult to compare the overall weight of a hiking stove as it depends on the amount of fuel you need and the pot set you choose (if it’s not included). In the list below, the weight will include all components sold with the backpacking stove so you’ll need to add on the additional weight of your fuel and pots that aren’t included.

But generally, you’ll find that liquid fuel stoves and integrated canister stoves are the heaviest of the bunch. The lightest options are the wood-burning and solid-fuel tablet stoves as they don’t require such heavy fuel.

Efficiency Of Backpacking Stoves

Cooking a hot backpacking meal on Mt Victoria in cold hiking conditions

To measure the efficiency of a hiking stove, you need to consider three main factors – boil time, the BTU and the amount of water boiled per 100 g of fuel. These factors will reveal how long it takes to boil water and how much fuel is used to do so.

You’ll generally find these specs listed in the product description of each stove but don’t base your entire decision solely on these numbers. They were all tested in a controlled environment and can vary considerably when you throw high winds and frigid temperatures in the mix.

Only the integrated stoves will come close to the suggested boil time when exposed to the wind due to their windproof design.

Boil Time

This number indicates how long it will take for your stove to bring water to a boil in a controlled environment.

A fast boil time is beneficial if you need to melt snow or cook dinner quickly to catch that sunset. But most often, a fast boil time also correlates with a shorter burn time which will require you to carry more fuel on longer expeditions.

Water Boiled

The ‘water boiled’ measurement tells us how many litres of water can be boiled per 100 g (or ml) of fuel used. A more efficient camping stove will have the ability to boil more water per 100 g of fuel, allowing you to carry less fuel on your hiking trips. But this often means the boil time will be longer as well. A higher amount of water boiled per 100 g (or ml) of fuel is desirable for multi-day hikes and to save money on fuel.

Burner Power (BTU)

Another number you’ll come across is the BTU (British Thermal Units) or Watts, which measures the heat output of the stove. Essentially, a higher BTU will indicate that the burner is more powerful but all that really tells us is that it uses more fuel.

There are many more factors that need to be considered in regard to burner power that isn’t included in the BTU. These are the size of the burner, the design of the stove and its boil time (efficiency).

Note: It’s best to keep things simple and consider the boil time and water boiled, leaving this number out unless you’re in great need of a highly powerful backpacking stove (which could be the case in extreme weather conditions).

Wind Resistance and Shields

Best Hiking stoves wind shield

The last component that affects the efficiency of a hiking stove is its resistance to the wind. If the flame is exposed then no matter what boil time it boasts, it will be far less efficient in windy conditions compared to a protected flame that you’d find in an integrated stove.

But if integrated stoves aren’t what you’re looking for, you can still beat some of the wind by purchasing a windshield for your hiking stove. This is a flexible lightweight aluminium sheet or panel that wraps around your setup to reflect heat back to the pot and protect the flame from the wind.

However, windshields (or windscreens) are rendered useless if you carry a larger fuel canister as they’re generally too short to reach the flame. Windshields work best for remote canister stoves and liquid-fuel stoves.

Important Features Of Hiking Stoves

Fuel Regulator / Pressure Regulator

A fuel regulator – aka pressure regulator – controls how much fuel pressure is being fed to the stove. This allows it to consistently feed the optimal amount of fuel to the stove regardless of any external factors.

A backpacking stove fuel regulator achieves this by maintaining (regulating) the pressure output of the stove for optimal performance regardless of the pressure inside the canister. This is essential when you’re hiking in frigid temperatures and high altitudes as it allows the fuel to burn at a consistent rate and avoids wasting any unnecessary fuel.

It is only in severely cold climates or when the canister is near empty that the pressure will drop below the limit of which the regulator can control.

Simmer Control

MSR Pocket Rocket, an ultralight hiking stove for backcountry camping

Unless you’re simply using your hiking stove to boil water, you’ll want to choose a design that has simmer capabilities. Most canister and liquid-fuel stoves will support a twist valve that can control the size of the flame, but models that include a fuel regulator provide more consistency and finer adjusting simmer control. You’ll find this information listed in the features of each hiking stove below.

Solid-fuel tablets and wood-burning stoves are the worst at simmer control, while alcohol stoves aren’t far off. Some alcohol stoves will have a little cover that you can partially put over the flame, but these are finicky and less efficient.

Built-In Igniters

Soto Windmaster Hiking Stove for cooking in the backcountry

On some integrated and non-integrated canister stoves, you’ll often find built-in igniters. The igniters work better in windy or cold conditions when you can’t keep a match alight and they also save on waste. However, they do add a touch of weight and are often unreliable so it’s best to keep a backup packet of matches just in case.

Pot Set And Size

While some hiking stoves – mainly the integrated stoves – will come with a pot set included, many don’t. You’ll find countless options in various outdoor hiking stores that range in size and efficiency. For the most fuel-saving option, look for a pot that has a built-in ‘flux ring’ design (aluminium folds) on the base. This design drastically improves heat exchange, resulting in quicker boil times and a more efficient hiking stove. Some examples of this are the Macpac Heat Exchange Pot and the Kathmandu Ascent Pot and Fry Pan.

Heat Exchange on the bottom of a good Hiking Stove Pot

The size you choose for your pot depends on how many people you’re cooking for and your average portion sizes. We have recently purchased the Sumo Jetboil and the 1.8l pot size is perfect for the two of us, who eat quite large meals. We previously owned a 1.5l pot which was just a touch too small but is most likely perfect for the average couple. The average solo hiker will find a 1l pot more than enough, but to save weight you can always opt for a smaller pot size.

Sustainability Of Hiking Stoves

Unfortunately, like hiking backpacks and hiking boots, camping stoves aren’t winning any awards for sustainability as they’re predominantly constructed of hard metals and plastics and predominantly use fossil fuels.

The most sustainable option is the wood-burning stove, followed by alcohol and then liquid-fuel stoves. The stoves that use isobutane/propane gas canisters are the least sustainable due to the inability to reuse the canisters and the need to dispose of them correctly (which many don’t do or don’t know how to do).

How To Dispose of Isobutane/Propane Gas Canisters

To dispose of gas canisters at home, you need to puncture them first to release any remaining gas. The best way to do this is to purchase the Jetboil CrunchIt tool, then you can simply throw the canister into your recycling bin – after checking whether your recycling program takes mixed metals.

If your recycling program doesn’t take mixed metals, you can drop your punctured canister at a recycling and waste depot.

16 Best Hiking Stoves In Australia For 2024

Quick Buyers Guide For Hiking Stoves

  • Liquid-fuel stoves are the best option for high altitudes, freezing conditions and international travel
  • Integrated canister stoves are often the lightest, cheapest and most wind-resistant choice, and when fitted with a regulator, are a great choice for extreme conditions
  • Canister stoves are the best choice for entry-level hikers on a budget
  • Choose a hiking stove with a fuel regulator for better simmer control and efficiency when the temperature drops
  • Liquid-fuel stoves are more sustainable compared to canister stoves due to the ability to refill bottles
  • Integrated gas canister stoves provide the fastest boil times when exposed to the elements and the best wind resistance
  • A fast boil time (high BTU) can often mean less fuel efficiency, check the amount of water boiled per 100 g of fuel to find the most efficient cost-effective option

Best Hiking Stoves Comparison Table

Hiking StovePriceTypeBoil Time / LitreBTULitres Boiled / 100g FuelWeightPotset IncludedPacked SizePressure Regulator
Jetboil Flash$280 $230Integrated Canister3:30900010L400 gYes10 x 18.3 cmNo
Jetboil MiniMo$370
$310
Integrated Canister4:30600012L415 gYes12.7 x 14 cmYes
MSR Windburner$350Integrated Canister4:3070008L430 gYes11.5 x 18 cmYes
Jetboil Sumo$380
$315
Integrated Canister4:10600010.5L453 gYes12.5 x 21 cmYes
Jetboil Zip$220
$190
Integrated Canister5:004,50012L340 gYes10.4 x 16.5 cmNo
Primus Lite$225Integrated Canister5:204,50011.5L402 gYes9.9 x 13 cmNo
360 Degree Furno$60Canister Mount3:2011,9008L99 gNo12 x 5 x 5 cmNo
Jetboil MightyMo$130Canister Mount3:0010,00012L95 gNo10.4 x 9 cmYes
MSR Pocketrocket 2$150Canister Mount3:3011,5007L73 gNo4.3 x 7.3 x 3.3 cmNo
Soto Windmaster$110Canister Mount4:3011,0007L130 gNo4.7 x 7.7 x 4.4 cmNo
MSR Windpro II$295Remote Canister3:4011,0007L190 gNo10 x 7.5 x 15 cmNo
MSR Whisperlite International$305Liquid Fuel3:309,7004.4L320 gNo10 x 10 x 15 cmYes
MSR Whisperlite Universal$415Multi-Fuel3:309,7004.4L320 gNo10 x 10 x 15 cmYes
Trangia Spirit$37Alcohol Fuel10:003,5009L110 gNo7.5 x 4.2 cmNo
Toaks STV 12$90Wood-BurningN/AN/AN/A151 gNo9.4 x 9.4 cmNo
Esbit Pocket$85Solid-Fuel Tablet20:00N/A500ml / Tablet92 gNo10 x 8 x 2.3 cmNo

For heavily discounted prices on Jetboil follow our links below

Integrated Gas Canister Stoves

Jetboil Flash – Best All-In-One Choice For Boiling Water 

For insanely fast boil times in a range of conditions, you can’t beat the Jetboil Flash – Jetboil’s flagship integrated stove. While some canister stoves will beat the 3 minutes and 30 second boil time in a controlled setting, the Flash will win when exposed to the elements – especially in windy conditions.

The Jetboil Flash is also the cheapest and lightest integrated stove option on this list, weighing a total of 400 g including the 1-litre pot. The Primus Lite Plus comes close in price, actually costing $15 less, but only provides a 500 ml pot.

However, there is a major drawback to the Jetboil Flash which is the lack of a fuel regulator. This restricts the ability to simmer and lowers its performance when the temperature dips.

What it’s good for:

The Jetboil Flash’s all-in-one design is a budget-friendly option that excels in boiling water fast and is super simple to use. This makes it quite appealing to casual and first-time hikers who plan to use store-bought dehydrated meals.

Price: $280 $230 AUD
Type: Integrated Gas Canister Stove
Weight: 400 g
Packed Size: 10.16 x 18.3 cm
Boil Time: 3 mins 30 sec / 1 litre
BTU:
9,000
Water Boiled: 10 litres per 100 g
Built-in Igniter: Yes
Fuel/Pressure Regulator: No

Jetboil Flash, one of the best stoves for hiking in the alpine

Features:

  • 1 Litre FluxRing cooking pot comes with an insulating cozy to keep water warm and protect your hands
  • The insulated cover has a thermochromatic colour change heat indicator that lets you know when the water has boiled
  • Fabric handle allows easy pouring
  • Reliable push-button ignition eliminates the need for matches
  • The lid includes a drinking and pouring spout and strainer
  • Measuring cup and bowl doubles as a cover for the bottom of the Jetboil Flash
  • Compatible with all Jetboil accessories
  • Includes a fuel stabiliser tripod
  • 1-year limited warranty

Positives

  • Extremely fast boil time even in windy conditions
  • Lightweight and affordable in comparison to other options
  • Compact – everything fits inside easily

Negatives

  • No simmer control
  • Not as efficient at higher altitudes or in the snow
  • The plastic base connecting the stove to the burner is slightly flimsy

Jetboil MiniMo – Best For Simmer Control

For the backcountry chef’s out there, nothing beats the simmer control of the Jetboil MiniMo. The incremental adjustments provide the ability to make delicious meals wherever you are – saving money by not needing to buy ready-made dehydrated meals.

For the MiniMo, Jetboil has redesigned the 1-litre FluxRing cooking pot, making it shorter and wider in order to provide the ideal eating vessel for one

What it’s good for:

The Jetboil MiniMo is the best hiking stove for solo adventurers who prioritise a good home-cooked meal. On top of superior simmer control, the fuel regulator also ensures that the MiniMo will stay reliable when the temperature plummets.

Price: $370 $310 AUD
Type: Integrated Gas Canister Stove
Weight: 415 g
Packed Size: 12.7 x 14 cm
Boil Time: 4 mins 30 sec / 1 litre
BTU:
6,000
Water Boiled: 12 litres per 100 g
Built-in Igniter: Yes
Fuel/Pressure Regulator: Yes

Jetboil Minimo backpacking stove for cooking in the mountains

Features:

  • 1-litre FluxRing cooking cup is shorter and wider than most to enable ease of cooking and eating
  • Insulated cozy helps your meal stay warm
  • Silicone-coated metal handles provide a good grip for stirring and eating
  • The lid features a drinking and pouring spout and a strainer
  • Sideways burner storage inside the pot provides a compact design
  • Measuring cup and bowl doubles as a cover for the bottom of the Jetboil MiniMo
  • The fuel regulator allows incremental adjustments for superior simmer control, plus consistent performance down to -6℃
  • Reliable push-button igniter
  • Includes a fuel stabiliser tripod
  • 1-year limited warranty

Positives

  • Unbeatable simmer control
  • Lightweight for its efficiency
  • Fuel-efficient
  • Good for cold weather

Negatives

  • Expensive
  • Longer boil time
  • The plastic base connecting the stove to the burner is slightly flimsy

MSR Windburner – Best Wind Resistance

The MSR Windburner integrated hiking stove is the one you want when the winds increase. Its windproof design excels above Jetboil’s similar design and has proven to be the best wind-resistant hiking stove on this list.

In addition to this, the MSR Windburner is equipped with a fuel regulator that allows for simmer control and good performance when the temperature drops

The downside to the MSR Windburner is its slightly heavier design and lower fuel efficiency compared to other integrated stoves with similar boil times.

What it’s good for:

The MSR Windburner is your go-to if you’re hiking destinations are prone to high winds and near-zero temperatures. Its compact design allows for ease of packing and the 1-litre lock-on pot is the perfect size for one.

Price: $350 AUD
Type: Integrated Gas Canister Stove
Weight: 430 g
Packed Size: 11.5 x 18 cm
Boil Time: 4 mins 30 sec / 1 litre
BTU:
7,000
Water Boiled: 8 litres per 100 g
Built-in Igniter: No
Fuel/Pressure Regulator: Yes

MSR Windburner integrated canister hiking stove for camping in the mountains

Features:

  • The 1-litre wind-resistant cooking pot features an insulating cozy to keep your food warm and hands safe
  • Fabric handle allows for easy pouring
  • Windproof radiant burner and pressure regulator allow for simmer control and better efficiency in cold weather
  • 500 ml bowl attaches to the bottom of the pot and can be used as a measuring cup
  • The BPA-free lid has a sipping and pouring spout and a strainer
  • Compatible with the 1.8-litre duo pot (purchase separately)
  • Includes a fuel stabiliser tripod

Positives

  • Superior performance in windy conditions
  • Compatible with a larger pot
  • Affordable

Negatives

  • Heavier than similar competitors
  • No push button igniter
  • Low fuel efficiency in comparison to other options

Jetboil Sumo – Best For Couples

The Jetboil Sumo is the answer to an adventure couple’s prayers – or a group of up to 4 if you eat smaller meals…

Only 40g heavier than the similar Jetboil MiniMo, the Sumo’s 1.8-litre cooking pot and incremental simmer control makes it the perfect hiking stove for couples that love to cook up a storm.

We recently purchased the Jetboil Sumo and find the compact design and size incredibly convenient for our adventures. Not to mention, the wind resistance and ability to handle freezing temperatures mean this hiking stove will be coming on all our expeditions with us.

The only downside we’ve experienced so far is the flimsy plastic stove base that connects to the FluxRing cooking pot. Although we’re yet to have any issues, It feels less stable than I would have liked for the price point.

What it’s good for:

Due to the large pot size, the Jetboil Sumo is the best hiking stove for adventure couples who love to cook. The fuel regulator allows for incremental simmer control and efficiency even when the temperature falls below zero.

Price: $380 $315 AUD
Type: Integrated Gas Canister Stove
Weight: 453 g
Packed Size: 12.5 x 21 cm
Boil Time: 4 mins 10 sec / 1 litre
BTU:
6,000
Water Boiled: 10.5 litres per 100 g
Built-in Igniter: Yes
Fuel/Pressure Regulator: Yes

Jetboil Sumo, one of the best hiking stoves for groups cooking on hikes

Features:

  • 1.8-litre FluxRing cooking pot with an insulated cozy to keep your food warm and hands safe
  • Fabric handle allows for ease of pouring and stirring
  • The lid features a drinking and pouring spout and strainer
  • Measuring cup and bowl doubles as a cover for the bottom of the Jetboil Sumo
  • Compatible with the Jetboil Grande coffee press, skillet and 1.5-litre FluxRing cooking pot (all sold separately)
  • The fuel regulator provides incremental adjustments for exceptional simmer control and consistent performance down to -6℃
  • Reliable push-button igniter
  • A 230 g fuel canister can fit inside the pot for ease of storage
  • Includes fuel stabiliser tripod
  • 1-year limited warranty

Positives

  • Lightweight and affordable option for couples or groups
  • Superior simmer control
  • Works well in cold conditions

Negatives

  • Overkill for one person
  • The plastic base connecting the stove to the burner is slightly flimsy

Jetboil Zip

The Jetboil Zip offers a lightweight alternative to the Jetboil Flash for solo hikers wanting to save weight. The 0.8-litre FluxRing pot is the perfect size for one and the lower BTU allows for increased fuel efficiency.

As a result, the boil time is a little slower at 2.5 minutes for just 500 ml. But the lower price point, higher efficiency and lighter weight could be worth waiting a few seconds longer for your tea!

What it’s good for:

Due to the absence of a fuel regulator, the Jetboil Zip is restricted with less simmer control and lowered efficiency in freezing temperatures. However, for solo hikers looking to save weight and cost on fuel, the Jetboil Zip is the ideal choice.

Price: $220 $190 AUD
Type: Integrated Gas Canister Stove
Weight: 340 g
Packed Size: 10.41 x 16.5 cm
Boil Time: 5 mins / 1 litre
BTU:
4,500
Water Boiled: 12 litres per 100 g
Built-in Igniter: No
Fuel/Pressure Regulator: No

Jetboil Zip hiking stove, an extremely efficient integrated canister stove for backpacking

Features:

  • 0.8-litre FluxRing cooking pot features an insulating cozy to keep water warm and protect your hands
  • Fabric handle provides easy and safe pouring and holding
  • The lid is equipped with a drinking and pouring spout plus a strainer
  • Measuring cup and bowl doubles as a cover for the bottom of the Jetboil Zip
  • Compatible with all Jetboil accessories
  • Includes fuel stabiliser tripod
  • 1-year limited warranty

Positives

  • Lightweight and fuel-efficient
  • Perfect size for one
  • Affordable

Negatives

  • No fuel regulator and as a result, no simmer control
  • Longer boil time
  • No push-button igniter
  • The plastic base connecting the stove to the burner is slightly flimsy

Primus Lite Plus

For solo hikers that have no need for a large pot, the Primus Lite Plus is a worthy contender. The 0.5-litre pot saves space in your pack while still offering the same efficiency as larger integrated canister stoves.

But that, and a sustainably made cooking pot sleeve, is about the only leg up the Primus Lite Plus has on its competition. It’s heavier, more expensive and slightly less efficient in both boil time and water boiled compared to the similar Jetboil Zip.

What it’s good for:

The Primus Lite Plus is a worthy backpacking stove for solo hikers looking to save space in their backpacks. The small 0.5-litre cooking pot can fit the burner and a 100 g canister inside for desired compact storage.

Price: $225 AUD
Type: Integrated Gas Canister Stove
Weight: 402 g
Packed Size: 9.91 x 13 cm
Boil Time: 5 mins 20 sec / 1 litre (2 mins 45 seconds for the included 0.5l pot)
BTU:
4,500
Water Boiled: 11.5 litres per 100 g
Built-in Igniter: Yes
Fuel/Pressure Regulator: No

Primus Lite Hiking Stove for cooking in the wilderness

Features:

  • 0.5-litre cooking pot with integrated heat exchanger for increased efficiency in windy conditions
  • The cork-lined insulated cooking pot sleeve is made from G-1000 ECO lite fabric with a sleeve pocket to hold accessories
  • Bio-based plastic lid doubles as a small bowl
  • Includes a bio-based plastic fuel stabiliser stand
  • Reliable push-button igniter
  • Includes pot support pegs to use with any other cooking pots or pans

Positives

  • Small compact design
  • Sustainably made cooking pot sleeve

Negatives

  • Expensive for its size
  • Heavy for its size
  • Not as efficient as the competition

Gas Canister Stoves

360 Degree Furno Stove – Best Budget Option

The 360 Degree Furno stove is the ultimate budget-friendly hiking stove on the market. You won’t find any that come close to its price point while offering that same tough and simple design.

Our first hiking stove was the 360 Degree Furno and it has lasted us over 5 years without even a hint of failing. The only reason we upgraded to the Jetboil Sumo is because it is far more efficient in the alpine and during winter – which we find ourselves adventuring in quite often. But for overnight summer adventures, we’ll still reach for this tiny beast of a stove.

While you can choose to purchase any pot set that tickles your fancy, the 360 Degree Furno does come in a set for an unbeatable $97 AUD. However, the pots included in that are quite small and inefficient in any kind of wind.

What it’s good for:

The 360 Degree Furno stove is a fantastic choice for entry-level and budget hikers. It’s simple to use design and high BTU allows for fast boiling times when the weather is fine. Plus, it’s near impossible to break this little burner – trust us, we’ve put it through heavy testing!

Price: $60 AUD
Type: Gas Canister Stove
Weight: 99 g
Packed Size: 12 x 5 x 5 cm
Boil Time: 3 mins 20 sec / 1 litre
BTU:
11,900
Water Boiled: 8 litres per 100 g
Built-in Igniter: No
Fuel/Pressure Regulator: No

360 Degree Furno backpacking stove

Features:

  • Durable stainless steel and aluminium alloy construction
  • Three pronged pot support for good stability
  • Includes a plastic container
  • Twist valve and stabilising arms fold in for compact storage
  • Can choose the 360 Degree Furno Stove pot set which includes a fuel canister stabiliser tripod, an 850 ml pot, a 350 ml pot that acts as a lid, a scourer and a mesh carry bag

Positives

  • Super affordable
  • Easy to use
  • Highly durable

Negatives

  • No fuel regulator
  • Not as fuel efficient
  • Heavier than the competition

Jetboil MightyMo – Best Simmer Control For Canister Stoves

The Jetboil MightyMo is one of the only gas canister stoves that is equipped with a fuel regulator for higher efficiency in cold weather and incremental simmer control. But is that worth the additional $100 compared to the 360 Degrees Furno stove?

In all honesty, the Jetboil MightyMo does perform much better than the 360 Degree Furno stove in all aspects, so if you’re looking for a super lightweight stove that you can pair with any cooking pot you want without sacrificing efficiency, then the MightyMo is the answer.

What it’s good for:

The Jetboil MightyMo is the best option for adventurers who’d rather use any pot they want but still get the same efficiency and control as the integrated gas canister stoves. But remember, the boil time and water boiled numbers are obtained in a controlled setting and unless you pair the MightyMo with a heat exchanging pot set, you’ll see lower efficiency out in the elements.

Price: $130 AUD
Type: Gas Canister Stove
Weight: 95 g
Packed Size: 10.4 x 9.5 cm
Boil Time: 3 mins / 1 litre
BTU:
10,000
Water Boiled: 12 litres per 100 g
Built-in Igniter: Yes
Fuel/Pressure Regulator: Yes

Jetboil Mightymo gas cooking stove, one of the best lightweight and portable stove for hiking

Features:

  • Four turn regulator offers incremental heat adjustments for great simmer control
  • The fuel regulator provides consistent performance down to -6℃
  • Accommodates the Jetboil skillet and FluxRing cooking pot (sold separately)
  • Three pronged pot support provides good pot stability and folds down for compact storage
  • Reliable push-button igniter
  • Includes a carry bag and a fuel stabiliser tripod
  • 1-year limited warranty

Positives

  • Highly efficient on paper or combined with a Jetboil FluxRing cooking pot
  • Includes a fuel regulator
  • Lightweight and compact

Negatives

  • Expensive
  • Less efficient in windy conditions
  • The burner head isn’t separated (which can increase wind resistance)

MSR PocketRocket 2 – Best Lightweight Option

The MSR PocketRocket 2 is an ultralight hiker’s dream, weighing in at only 73 g. The tiny design packs a punch with a 3 min 30 sec boil time and a divided burner head to increase wind control.

However, the fuel efficiency of the MSR PocketRocket 2 compared to the Jetboil MightyMo is much lower and without a fuel regulator, the PocketRocket really only has its weight and WindClip burner to hold over the MightyMo.

What it’s good for:

The MSR PocketRocket 2 provides a powerful burner and an ultralight base weight that will interest ultralight hikers and minimalists.

Price: $150 AUD
Type: Gas Canister Stove
Weight: 73 g
Packed Size: 4.3 x 3.3 x 7.3 cm
Boil Time: 3 mins 30 sec / 1 litre
BTU:
11,500 (conflicting data)
Water Boiled: 7 litres per 100 g
Built-in Igniter: No
Fuel/Pressure Regulator: No

MSR Pocket Rocket, an ultralight hiking stove for backcountry camping

Features:

  • Three pronged pot support fold inward for compact storage
  • WindClip wind protection divides the burner head into three for better efficiency in light wind
  • A flame controller allows finer adjustments
  • Includes hard-shell carry case
  • Best paired with the MSR Titan Kettle for a lightweight and super fast kit

Positives

  • Super lightweight
  • Powerful burner

Negatives

  • Not as efficient as the Jetboil MightyMo
  • No fuel regulator
  • Lower fuel efficiency

Soto Windmaster – Best Canister Stove For Wind Resistance

As the name suggests, the Soto Windmaster is the most efficient gas canister stove in windy conditions. This is achieved by its innovative concave burner design and removable pot supports that sit much closer to the burner to decrease the amount of wind that can pass between.

Plus, the Windmaster supports a very competitive weight and price compared to the other gas canister stoves on this list.

What it’s good for:

The Soto Windmaster is a great choice for ultralight hikers that often find themselves in windy conditions. The removable 4Flex pot supports can be swapped for the TriFlex pot supports (sold separately) for an even lower base weight.

Price: $110 AUD
Type: Gas Canister Stove
Weight: 87 g
Packed Size: 4.7 x 7.7 x 4.4 cm
Boil Time: 4 mins 30 sec / 1 litre
BTU:
11,000
Water Boiled: 7 litres per 100 g
Built-in Igniter: Yes
Fuel/Pressure Regulator: No

Soto Windmaster Hiking Stove for cooking in the backcountry

Features:

  • The concave burner head design protects the flame from the wind
  • A flame controller allows finer adjustments
  • Built-in auto igniter
  • Detachable 4Flex pot supports offer increased stability for larger pots
  • Option to purchase the TriFlex pot supports to save on weight

Positives

  • Great performance in windy conditions
  • Durable
  • Lightweight

Negatives

  • Doesn’t come with a carry case
  • Pot supports detach – easier to lose
  • No fuel regulator
  • Long boil time

Remote Gas Canister Stoves

MSR WindPro II Stove

For the most reliable remote gas canister stove, nothing beats the MSR WindPro II stove – but it comes at a hefty price.

The MSR WindPro is equipped with a stand that enables you to invert the gas canister when the temperatures drop. This enhances the performance of the stove in cold conditions and when the fuel level is low.

What it’s good for:

The MSR WindPro II is the ideal companion for hikers needing better performance in cold weather without resorting to the more time-consuming and finicky liquid-fuel stoves.

Price: $295 AUD
Type: Remote Gas Canister Stove
Weight: 190 g
Packed Size: 10.16 x 7.62 x 15.24 cm
Boil Time: 3 mins 40 sec / 1 litre
BTU:
11,000
Water Boiled: 7 litres per 100 g
Built-in Igniter: No
Fuel/Pressure Regulator: No

 

MSR Windpro 2 Backpacking stove, a great fuel stove for cooking in extreme weather conditions

Features:

  • Inverted liquid-feed stand improves cold weather and low fuel performance
  • Remote burner is lower to the ground, allowing a windscreen to be used for maximum efficiency
  • Supports pots up to 10 inches in diameter
  • Includes a windscreen, canister stand, heat reflector, instructions and a stuff sack

Positives

  • Better performance in cold weather compared to regular canister stoves
  • More stable design

Negatives

  • Expensive
  • No fuel regulator
  • Heavier than regular canister stoves

Liquid Fuel (and multi-fuel) Stoves

MSR Whisperlite International – Best For High Altitudes

For those high-altitude expeditions, the MSR Whisperlite International will be your best friend. Using liquid fuel instead of a gas canister, the Whisperlite works exceptionally well in cold temperatures. Plus, this hiking stove has the ability to use anything from kerosene to unleaded auto fuel, making it the most versatile option for travellers.

However, there are some major downsides to the MSR Whisperlite. Most important is the higher danger level associated with liquid fuel stoves if you don’t know how to use them properly. We’ve seen far too many close calls with hikers creating a small fireball due to incorrectly setting it up or failing to clean the line properly.

What it’s good for:

While we wouldn’t suggest a liquid fuel stove for entry-level or casual hikers, the MSR Whisperlite International is our top recommendation for experienced travellers and high-altitude hikers. The only option that offers more versatility is the MSR Whisperlite Universal below.

Price: $305 AUD
Type: Liquid Fuel Stove
Weight: 320 g
Packed Size: 10.16 x 10.16 x 15.24 cm
Boil Time: 3 min 30 sec / 1 litre (white gas)
BTU:
9,700 (white gas)
Water Boiled: 4.4 litres per 100 ml (white gas)
Built-in Igniter: No
Fuel/Pressure Regulator: Yes

MSR Whisperlite International, a great backpacking stove for International travel and cooking in cold weather

Features:

  • Multiple fuel sources are compatible, including white gas, kerosene and unleaded auto fuel
  • Stamped stainless steel legs provide excellent stability while saving weight
  • Folds down small enough to fit inside the 1.5 lt MSR pot
  • The self-cleaning ShakerJet technology and one piece leg assembly allow for fast cleaning and maintenance out in the backcountry
  • Includes a heat reflector, windscreen, fuel pump, small parts kit, instructions and a stuff sack

Positives

  • Highly reliable in cold conditions
  • Easy to find fuel all over the world
  • Compact design
  • More sustainable fuel
  • Liquid fuel is cheaper

Negatives

  • Expensive (still need to purchase pots)
  • Bigger learning curve compared to gas canister stoves
  • Takes much longer to set up and pack down 
  • Regular cleaning is required

MSR Whisperlite Universal – Best For International Travel

For an even more versatile hiking stove that can do it all, you’ve got the MSR Whisperlite Universal. This liquid stove can also convert to a remote gas canister stove for a lighter option on slightly warmer expeditions.

But with the remote and inverted design for the gas canister, this is still more efficient in cold weather compared to regular gas canister stoves and even fuel regulated integrated stoves – though these still win in windy conditions.

However, you will pay a pretty penny for the MSR Whisperlite Universal!

What it’s good for:

The Whisperlite Universal is the ultimate choice for hardcore world adventurers who need the most versatile hiking stove that will keep them fed wherever they are. 

Price: $415 AUD
Type: Multi-fuel Stove
Weight: 320 g
Packed Size: 10.16 x 10.16 x 15.24 cm
Boil Time: 3 mins 30 sec / 1 litre (white gas)
BTU:
9,700 (white gas)
Water Boiled: 4.4 litres per 100 ml (white gas)
Built-in Igniter: No
Fuel/Pressure Regulator: Yes

MSR Whisperlite Universal, a great backpacking stove for International travel and cooking in cold weather

Features:

  • Compatible with multi-fuel sources including white gas, kerosene, unleaded auto fuel and isobutane/propane gas canisters
  • Patent pending Aircontrol technology provides an optimal fuel/air mix for excellent performance
  • The canister liquid feed delivers better cold weather and low-fuel efficiency with a more consistent output
  • The canister liquid feed includes a stand to enable it to be inverted
  • Includes various liquid and canister fuel couplers that pair with fuel-specific jets for ease of transition
  • Folds down to fit inside an MSR 1.5 lt cooking pot
  • The self-cleaning ShakerJet technology and redesigned leg assembly allow for fast cleaning and maintenance out in the field
  • Includes a heat reflector, windscreen, fuel pump, instructions, small parts kit and a stuff sack

Positives

  • Extremely versatile
  • Can easily be used all over the world
  • Exceptional performance in cold weather and high altitudes
  • Can use more sustainable fuel options

Negatives

  • Very expensive
  • Large learning curve
  • Takes longer to set up, clean and pump fuel

Alcohol Fuel Stoves

Trangia Spirit Burner – Most Durable Option

The Trangia Spirit Burner is one of the most well-known and trusted alcohol fuel stoves on the market. The brass design is exceptionally durable and the addition of a simmer ring enables you to semi-confidently cook meals rather than simply boil water.

While an alcohol fuel stove wouldn’t be my first recommendation due to a long 10-minute boil time and the sooty mess that’s left behind on the pots, there’s no denying that the Trangia will last a lifetime. Plus, methylated spirits are much easier to come by compared to isobutane/propane gas canisters.

What it’s good for:

The Trangia Spirit Burner is a popular choice for long-distance hikers who need to rely on finding fuel in small towns. The durability and additional pot set that you can purchase with the Spirit Burner makes this an undeniably robust choice.

Price: $37 AUD
Type: Alcohol Fuel Stove
Weight: 110 g
Packed Size: 7.5 x 4.2 cm
Boil Time: 10 mins / 1 litre
BTU:
3,500
Water Boiled: 9 litres per 100 ml
Built-in Igniter: No
Fuel/Pressure Regulator: No

A Trangia Hiking Fuel Stove

Features:

  • Durable brass construction
  • Includes a simmer ring for flame control
  • Includes a screw-on lid to preserve any leftover fuel
  • Compatible with all Trangia pot sets

Positives

  • Relatively inexpensive
  • Extremely durable
  • Easy to access fuel
  • Fuel is more sustainable compared to gas canisters

Negatives

  • The recommended pot set makes this set-up heavy overall
  • Spirit burns dirty, causing black soot on the base of the pots
  • No fuel regulator
  • Long boil time

Wood-Burning Stoves

Toaks STV-12

When it comes to wood-burning stoves, you can find many varying designs, but the Toaks STV-12’s tin-can style has proven to be one of the best-performing choices for backpackers. The STV-12 is made of three stacking pieces of durable titanium that connect together to create an efficient chamber for burning wood as well as the gasses off the wood.

While a wood-burning stove eliminates the need for carrying fuel, it’s a long and messy process that is suited to a small niche of hikers. Not to mention, the use of wood-burning stoves is prohibited in many protected national parks – so if you choose this method please remember to check the fire restrictions before setting off.

What it’s good for:

The Toaks STV-12 wood-burning hiking stove is for adventurers wishing to feel closer to nature. Using a wood-burning stove is a novelty that requires more time and effort and will not be everyone’s ideal choice.

Price: $90 AUD
Type: Wood-burning Stove
Weight: 151 g
Packed Size: 9.4 x 9.4 cm
Boil Time: Dependant on wood
BTU:
Not applicable
Water Boiled: Not applicable
Built-in Igniter: No
Fuel/Pressure Regulator: No

Toaks STV 12 Backpacking stove for camping in the backcountry

Features:

  • Durable titanium construction
  • Vented cylinders create an efficient chamber for burning small forest debris
  • Packs down small and can fit inside the Toaks 750 ml cooking pot (sold separately)
  • Includes a durable nylon stuff sack

Positives

  • Efficient and fast design compared to other wood-burning stoves
  • Extremely durable
  • Sustainable fuel choice

Negatives

  • Messy way to cook
  • Long boil time
  • Often unreliable fuel source
  • Its use can be prohibited in fire-prone areas
  • Not effective in wet weather

Solid-Fuel Tablet Stoves

Esbit Pocket Stove

The Esbit Pocket Stove is a minimalistic choice for hikers wishing to move ultralight without the need for heavy fuel. As far as the competition goes, Esbit is one of the best options on the market for solid-fuel stoves due to its lightweight and packable design.

But aside from being a super lightweight option, the solid-fuel tablet stoves lack in all other departments. One fuel tablet burns for 12 minutes, which is just enough to boil 500 ml of water – but it can leave a sticky residue on the bottom of your cooking pot.

What it’s good for:

If you’re searching for the lightest hiking stove option out there, the Esbit Pocket Stove has you covered. However, with a super long boil time and a relatively high price per tablet, the lightweight design is the only reason to choose a solid-fuel tablet stove.

Note: Solid-tablet fuel stoves are also prohibited in many fire-prone national parks and reserves.

Price: $85 AUD
Type: Solid-fuel Tablet Stove
Weight: 92 g
Packed Size: 9.8 x 7.7 x 2.3 cm
Boil Time: 20 mins / 1 litre
BTU:
Unknown
Water Boiled: 500 ml per tablet
Built-in Igniter: No
Fuel/Pressure Regulator: No

Esbit Pocket Hiking stove

Features:

  • Constructed of electrolytic galvanised steel for exceptional durability
  • Folds down almost flat and can store the fuel tablets inside
  • Provides two cooking positions and is compatible will all sorts of pots and pans

Positives

  • Super lightweight
  • Fuel is lightweight too with no risk of leaking

Negatives

  • Very long boil time
  • Messy
  • Fuel tablets are expensive
  • No simmer control
  • The tablets can cause skin irritation if handled without gloves

Final Thoughts

Now that is a lot of information! We hope this has helped you narrow down which type of hiking stove is right for you and within that category, which product will serve your purpose best.

Just remember, if you’re hiking in high altitudes or freezing conditions, liquid-fuel stoves will be the most efficient – plus, fuel resupply is more reliable when travelling to a wide range of countries. But for the average hiker, gas canister stoves will be most suited for their ease of use and lightweight design. And if you find yourself in windy environments often, the integrated gas canister stoves will be your best friend.

What is your experience with hiking stoves? We’d love to hear about your favourite option or any issues you’ve had with the above suggestions. And if you have any questions regarding hiking stoves, please feel free to drop a comment below.

Happy Hiking 🙂

Last Updated: 31/12/2023